Cipher Identifier and Analyzer

Stuck with a cipher or cryptogram? This tool will help you identify the type of cipher, as well as give you information about possibly useful tools to solve it.

This tool uses AI/Machine Learning technology to recognize over 25 common ciphers and encodings including: Caesar Cipher, Vigenère Cipher (including the autokey variant), Beaufort Cipher (including the autokey variant), Playfair Cipher, Two-Square/Double Playfair Cipher, Columnar Transposition Cipher, Bifid Cipher, Four-Square Cipher, Atbash Cipher, and many more!

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Analysis Results

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For at complete list of code-breaking tools, click here.

Caesar Cipher

The Caesar cipher, also known as a shift cipher is one of the oldest and most famous ciphers in history. While being deceptively simple, it has been used historically for important secrets and is still popular among puzzlers.

Monoalphabetic Substitution Cipher

The monoalphabetic substitution cipher is a simple cipher, where letters are substituted by a different alphabet. It is one of the most popular ciphers.

Vigenère Cipher

The Vigenère cipher was invented in the mid-16th century and has ever since been popular in the cryptography and code-breaking community. Despite being called the Vigenère cipher in honor of Blaise de Vigenère, it was actually developed by Giovan Battista Bellaso.

Beaufort Cipher

The Beaufort Cipher is named after Sir Francis Beaufort. It is similar to the Vigenère, but the encryption and decryption is reciprocal (the encryption and decryption algorithms are the same).

Playfair Cipher

The Playfair cipher was invented in 1854 by Charles Wheatstone, but named after lord Playfair who heavily promoted the use of the cipher. It is a polygraphic substitution cipher, which encrypts pair of letters instead of single letters.

Atbash Cipher

The Atbash Cipher is a really simple substitution cipher that is sometimes called mirror code. It is believed to be the first cipher ever used. To use Atbash, you simply reverse the alphabet, so A encodes to Z, B to Y and so on.

Columnar Transposition Cipher

In a columnar transposition cipher, the message is written in a grid of equal length rows, and then read out column by column. The columns are chosen in a scrambled order, decided by the encryption key.

Base64

Base64 is another favorite among puzzle makers. Basically it can be used to encode anything into printable ASCII-characters. Not seldom will the contents need further decoding.

Base64 is easy to recognize. It consists of letters (about 50% uppercase and 50% lowercase), as well as numbers, and often equal-characters (=) at the end.

Morse Code

Morse Code is a highly reliable communications method, that can be transmitted in many ways, even during difficult and noisy environments. That makes it especially useful for puzzle games, where it is sometimes not fully obvious that a code is a Morse Code.

Morse Code can be recognized by the typical pattern: small groups of short and long signals. These signals could be actual tones, or other means such as lines, colors, letters or symbols.

Hexadecimal Codes

Hexadecimal Codes can represent ASCII, UTF-8, or more advanced encoding schemes. They can also represent the output of Hash functions or modern crypto algorithms like RSA, AES, etc.

Hexadecimal codes only use the digits 0-9 and letters A-F.

Binary Codes

Binary Codes can represent ASCII, UTF-8, or more advanced encoding schemes. They can also represent the output of Hash functions or modern crypto algorithms like RSA, AES, etc.

Binary codes only use the digits 0-1.

Decimal Codes

Decimal Codes can represent A1Z26, ASCII, or more advanced encoding schemes. They can also represent the output of Hash functions or modern crypto algorithms like RSA, AES, etc, even if they usually are presented in hexadecimal or binary format.

Decimal codes only use the digits 0-9.

ADFGX Cipher

The ADFGX cipher was used by the German Army during World War I. It was invented by Lieutenant Fritz Nebel and is a fractionating transposition cipher which combines a Polybius square with a columnar transposition. The name comes from the five possible letters used: A, D, F, G and X.

ADFGVX Cipher

The ADFGVX cipher was used by the German Army during World War I. It was invented by Lieutenant Fritz Nebel and is a fractionating transposition cipher which combines a Polybius square with a columnar transposition. The name comes from the six possible letters used: A, D, F, G, V and X.

Other Ciphers

More ciphers and encodings can be found here.

  • If your cipher consists of lines and dots, it could be a Pigpen Cipher.
  • If your cipher has runes, you could translate them here.
  • If your cipher has hardwritten symbols of men in various positions, it could be a dancing men cipher.
  • If your cipher has combinations of colors, it could be a hexahue code.